Pluractionality in Hausa

Author: Katerina Soucková
LOT Number: 287
ISBN: 978-94-6093-071-3
Pages: 245
Year: 2011
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Pluractionality in Hausa

This dissertation addresses the semantics of pluractional verbs in Hausa. The notion of pluractionality is discussed and delimited with respect to related phe - nomena such as aspect. A detailed description of pluractionality in Hausa is provided, presenting new data based on the author’s fieldwork. This description lays the empirical groundwork for a theoretical analysis of pluractionality. The interpretation of pluractional verbs in Hausa is viewed as the result of three semi-independent meaning components: event plurality, the non-equivalence condition constraining the process of event individuation, and additional con - ditions on use following from the fact that Hausa pluractionals are ‘special’ plurals. These three components do not all have the same status, both with respect to each other and across speakers. This accounts for some of the specific properties of Hausa pluractionals, as well as for much of the extensive varia - tion in the use and interpretation of pluractionals among speakers of Hausa. This thesis is of interest to both descriptive and theoretical linguists working on Hausa, pluractionality, or plurality in general.

Pluractionality in Hausa

This dissertation addresses the semantics of pluractional verbs in Hausa. The notion of pluractionality is discussed and delimited with respect to related phe - nomena such as aspect. A detailed description of pluractionality in Hausa is provided, presenting new data based on the author’s fieldwork. This description lays the empirical groundwork for a theoretical analysis of pluractionality. The interpretation of pluractional verbs in Hausa is viewed as the result of three semi-independent meaning components: event plurality, the non-equivalence condition constraining the process of event individuation, and additional con - ditions on use following from the fact that Hausa pluractionals are ‘special’ plurals. These three components do not all have the same status, both with respect to each other and across speakers. This accounts for some of the specific properties of Hausa pluractionals, as well as for much of the extensive varia - tion in the use and interpretation of pluractionals among speakers of Hausa. This thesis is of interest to both descriptive and theoretical linguists working on Hausa, pluractionality, or plurality in general.

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