Phonological Aspects of Nasality: an Element-Based Dependency Approach

Author: Bert Botma
LOT Number: 90
ISBN: 90-76864-54-3
Pages: 390
Year: 2004
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Phonological Aspects of Nasality
An Element-Based Dependency Approach

This dissertation provides a phonological characterization of nasals, nasalized
segments, and processes involving nasality, based on a range of cross-
linguistic data. The facts encountered are formalized in the framework of
Element-based Dependency, a new and highly constrained model of
phonological representations that combines insights from Dependency
Phonology and Element Theory. The analysis focuses primarily on the manner
and phonation properties of segments, both of which are represented in terms
of the elements |/|, |L|, and |H|. Of particular interest is the element |L|, which,
depending on its position in the phonological structure, is interpreted as
sonorancy, voice, or nasalization. Evidence for the variable interpretation of |L|
comes from a host of phonological processes, including nasal harmony and
postnasal voicing, and from the compatibility of manner, laryngeal, and
nasalization contrasts in phonological segment types.

Discussing data from a wide range of languages, this dissertation is of interest
to a general phonological readership.

Phonological Aspects of Nasality
An Element-Based Dependency Approach

This dissertation provides a phonological characterization of nasals, nasalized
segments, and processes involving nasality, based on a range of cross-
linguistic data. The facts encountered are formalized in the framework of
Element-based Dependency, a new and highly constrained model of
phonological representations that combines insights from Dependency
Phonology and Element Theory. The analysis focuses primarily on the manner
and phonation properties of segments, both of which are represented in terms
of the elements |/|, |L|, and |H|. Of particular interest is the element |L|, which,
depending on its position in the phonological structure, is interpreted as
sonorancy, voice, or nasalization. Evidence for the variable interpretation of |L|
comes from a host of phonological processes, including nasal harmony and
postnasal voicing, and from the compatibility of manner, laryngeal, and
nasalization contrasts in phonological segment types.

Discussing data from a wide range of languages, this dissertation is of interest
to a general phonological readership.

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