Building a Phonological Inventory: Feature Co-occurrence Constraints in Acquisition

Author: Burght Marinus van 't Veer
LOT Number: 381
ISBN: 978-94-6093-163-5
Pages: 237
Year: 2015
€32.00
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The Feature Co-occurrence Constraint theory proposed in this dissertation provides a means to capture the development of the language learning child’s segment inventory. It does this by combining a growing set of features with constraints that are automatically activated as soon as these features are acquired. Representation and derivation go hand in hand, and develop together during acquisition. The Feature Co-occurrence Constraint theory builds on a minimal view on phonology, where the inventory is seen as epiphenomenal rather than a mentally ‘real’ object, features are few and monovalent, and the constraint set is limited to no more than two types. The theoretical consequences of the proposal for both feature theory and constraint theory are worked out in detail and a thorough discussion of phonological acquisition is provided, making that this book should be of interest to both theoretical phonologists
and acquisitionists.

The Feature Co-occurrence Constraint theory proposed in this dissertation provides a means to capture the development of the language learning child’s segment inventory. It does this by combining a growing set of features with constraints that are automatically activated as soon as these features are acquired. Representation and derivation go hand in hand, and develop together during acquisition. The Feature Co-occurrence Constraint theory builds on a minimal view on phonology, where the inventory is seen as epiphenomenal rather than a mentally ‘real’ object, features are few and monovalent, and the constraint set is limited to no more than two types. The theoretical consequences of the proposal for both feature theory and constraint theory are worked out in detail and a thorough discussion of phonological acquisition is provided, making that this book should be of interest to both theoretical phonologists
and acquisitionists.

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